Extremely Rare And Important Iznik ‘damascus-style’ Pottery Dish Circle Of Musli

Decorated in the ‘saz leaf and rosette’ style in shades of cobalt-blue, turquoise, manganese purple and sage green, all with thin black outlines, with saz leaves forming a central pole medallion containing scale pattern centred on four conjoined trefoils, the medallion surrounded by floral sprays and palmettes bearing saz leaves, the reverse with groups of three tulips alternating with rosettes. The present dish, in the so-called ‘Damascus style’, is an extremely rare example from the most creative and highly prized period of Iznik ceramic production. Produced between circa 1525 and 1555, these wares superceded those painted in cobalt blue and turqoise (made from copper oxide), and include sage green and manganese purple, to achieve a polychrome palette for the first time. The decoration of the present dish is attributable to the circle of master Musli (al-Din), the artist who signed his name on a mosque lamp now in the British Museum, London (inv. no. 87.5-16.1, published by Julian Raby & Nurhan Atasoy, Iznik, London 1989, col. pl. 355). The mosque lamp, dated 956 AH / 1549 AD, was almost certainly commissioned by Sultan Suleyman the Magnificent for the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem, is the premier documentary object of Iznik pottery. The inscription on the lamp also includes a reference to the local sufi Saint Eşrefzade Rumi and an allusion to the lake of Iznik (attesting the Iznik attribution). Further dating evidence for this group is confirmed by tiles in the mosque of Sultan Suleyman the Magnificent’s vizier, Hadim Ibrahim Pasha, in Silivrikapi, Istanbul. Please see Belgin Demirsar Arli & Ara Altun, Tiles – Treasures of Anatolian Soil – Ottoman Period, Istanbul, 2008, pp. 168-69. The Musli lamp relates to three basins; two in the British Museum, London (inv. no. G.1983.67; 1983.66), and one in the Victoria and Albert Museum , London (inv. no. C.1979-1910), assigned by Julian Raby and Nurhan Atasoy to the circle of Musli (Raby&Atasoy, Iznik, 1989, p. 135). The mosque lamp and the three basins share decorative features including turquoise medallions containing black cloud bands and arabesques as well as a border of white tulips set against blue cartouchesOur dish is undoubtably from the same workshop as the three basins. Closest comparison can be made with the basin in the British Museum (inv. no. G. 1983.67) illustrated above. The palmettes on this basin are strikingly similar to the palmettes on the present dish. These palmettes in both cases are formed by a pomegranate framed by blossoms above and leaves below. The British Museum basin and our dish also share the same use of colour for the palmettes viz turqouise pomegranate, blue leaves, green blossoms. The manganese purple employed in the blossoms, is an unstable, experimental colour, firing anywhere in colour between dark purple and pink. It was superceded in the late 1550s by the well-known sealingwax red. Palmettes of this type are a major component of the saz leaf and palmette style, developed in the first half of the 16th century by the court designer Shahqulu. They can be seen on two kaftans possibly made for sons of Sultan Süleyman the Magnificent, now in Topkapi Palace Museum (inv. no. 13/37 and 13/529), please see Nurhan Atasoy et al, Ipek, London, 2001, pl. 22-23.

Provenance:

Extremely Rare And Important Iznik ‘damascus-style’ Pottery Dish Circle Of Musli magnifing glass

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Cantagalli Iznik-style Footed Bowl

Rising from trumpet foot to wide rounded sides with slightly flaring rim, the white ground decorated with cobalt-blue, manganese purple, green hatayi flowers and saz leaves, the foot with a band of scrolls followed by scrolling saz leaves bordered above with band of stylized flowers, the interior with floral register including tulips, and rosettes and a floral band, intact.

Founded by Ulisse and Giuseppe Cantagalli in Florence, the Cantegalli 'Iznik-style' ceramics can be identified by their signature cockerel marker on the base of the vessels. This unique signature and the non-Iznik typical size and form of many Cantagalli vessels reveals that the Italian producers did not seek simply to create Iznik reproductions. The polychrome style and saz leaf motifs borrowed from Iznik are however quite similar and has even resulted in the occasional past misattribution. See: Walter B. Denny, Iznik: The Artistry of Ottoman Ceramics, London, 2004, p. 222.

For comparable works produced in Cantagalli workshops in the Iznik-style see: Giovanni Conti & Gilda Cefariello Grosso, La Maiolica Cantagalli, Cassa di Risparmio di Firenze, Roma, 1990, pp. 62-64. Also see: The Revival of Italian Maiolica: Ginori and Cantagalli, Edizioni Polistampa, Firenze, 2011, pp. 220-224

cantagalli iznik-style footed bowl magnifing glass

Kutahya Dish Decorated With The Tughra Of Sultan Abdulhamid II (R. 1876-1909)

The present dish bears the tughra of Sultan Abdulhamid II (r. 1876-1909), also bears a prayer to the Sultan in Turkish, “muzaffer ol daim” (May you be always victorious) in thuluth script. The upper half of the dish is decorated with the Ottoman imperial arms.

For a comparable Kutahya-ware, similarly decorated with calligraphy, please see Terres d’Islam – Les Collections de Céramique Moyen-Orientale du Musée Ariana a Geneve, Ariana, Geneve, 2014, pp. 270-271.

Kutahya Dish Decorated With The Tughra Of Sultan Abdulhamid II magnifing glass

Unusual Iznik Dish Decorated With A House

Of deep rounded form, decorated underglaze blue, relief red and olive green, outlined in black, with a central depiction of a house, the rim with black circular and spiral wave motifs.

An Iznik dish, decorated with a comparable underglaze painted house scene is in the Sadberk Hanim Museum in Istanbul, please see Hülya Bilgi, Asırlar Sonra Bir Arada – Sadberk Hanım Müzesi’nin Yurtdışından Türkiye’ye Kazandırdığı Eserler, Vehbi Koç Vakfı, 2005, p. 90-91. Also see Splendeurs de la Cermamique Ottomane des Collections Suna-İnan Kıraç et du Musée Sadberk Hanım, Musée Jacquemart-André – Institut de France, Istanbul, 2000, p. 95.

Unusual Iznik Dish Decorated With A House magnifing glass

Iznik-style Theodore Deck Dish

With scalloped rim, the white ground finely decorated with vines and bunch grapes and peony-like blossoms around, the reverse decorated with paired tulips and rosettes, marked TH. DECK

This dish by Theodore Deck is a copy of an important Iznik dish, dated 1545-50, in the British Museum, please see: Nurhan Atasoy & Julian Raby, Iznik, London, 1989, fig.241, pp.137-138. Another from the same series by the French ceramicist is exhibited at the Victoria and Albert Museum and dated 1865 (id. 226-1896). Also see: Hitzel, Frédéric & Mireille Jacotin. Iznik – L’Aventure d’une Collection, Musee National de la Renaissance – Chateau d’Ecouen, Paris, 2005, p. 41.

Provenance: Private French Collection

Iznik-style Theodore Deck Dish magnifing glass

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Pair Of Tekfursaray Tiles

Of square form, decorated in underglaze cobalt blue, light blue, green and relief red with a design of a flower bouquet. Under Sultan Ahmed III, with the enterprise of Grand-vizier Damad Ibrahim Pasha a tile workshop was established in the Tekfur Saray, in Istanbul, to revive tile production. Damad Ibrahim Pasha established a tile workshop in the so-called Tekfur Palace to revive tile production. The Tekfur Palace was part of a group of Byzantine palaces known collectively as the Blachernae Palaces built up against the land walls overlooking Eyüp. Craftsmen from Iznik kilns came to Istanbul in 1719 and ateliers were established in Tekfur Sarayı which were active between 1725 and 1735, for ten years. Tekfur Saray started production in 1724 or 1725. A trial production probably started around 1720. Most of the tiles are manufactured in 25 x 25cm, dimensions based on Iznik tiles. Tiles produced in Tekfur Saray Palace workshops are found on the Sultan Ahmed III fountain, in the Ayasofya Library, the Ferruh Kethuda Mosque in Balat, the Hekimoğlu Ali Pasha Mosque in Kocamustafapaşa, the Kaptan Paşa Mosque in Üsküdar, the Mehmed Ağa Mosque in Çarşamba, the Kandilli Mosque in Kandilli, and the Holy Mantle Pavilion in the Topkapi Palace. In addition, the Cezeri Kasım Pasha Mosque tiles are dated 1725 and the fireplace of the Fuad Pasha Yalısı, which burnt down in 1864, now in the Victoria and Albert Museum, is signed and dated 1730.

Provenance: Private UK collection

Pair Of Tekfursaray Tiles magnifing glass

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Important Kutahya Ceramic Rose-Water Sprinkler

This rare rose-water sprinkler belongs to a small group of 18th century Kütahya rose-water sprinklers renowned for gracefully combining pale blue, light manganese purple, yellow, dark coral red. The incised appliction vertically dividing the body into six elliptic sections is a rare appliction which adds depth to the surface of the bulbous body. These sprinklers were used for serving rose-water following ceremonial events. A comparable 18th century rose-water sprinkler is published in Garo Kürkman’s Toprak, Ateş, Sır, 2005, p. 215. For a similarly incised rose-water sprinkler please see; Toprak, Ateş, Sır, 2005, p. 191. Şebnem Akalın & Hülya Bilgi, Yadigar-ı Kütahya - Suna ve İnan Kıraç Koleksiyonundan Kütahya Seramikleri, Akdeniz Medeniyetleri Araştırma Enstitüsü, İstanbul, 1997, pp. 42-51. Also see the exhibition catalogue: Splendeurs de la Cermamique Ottomane des Collections Suna-İnan Kıraç et du Musée Sadberk Hanım, Musée Jacquemart-André – Institut de France, Istanbul, 2000, pp. 126-131.

Provenance: Private UK Collection

Important Kutahya Ceramic Rose-Water Sprinkler magnifing glass

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Rare Kutahya Ceramic Bowl

This bowl belongs to a small group of 18th century Kütahya ceramics renowned for gracefully combining pale blue, light green, yellow, dark coral red. The incised application decorating the body surface is rare. It adds depth to the surface of the body. These bowls were used for serving food during and after ceremonial events. It is a charming example displaying distinctive characteristics of 18th century Kutahya ceramics. A comparable 18th century bowl is published in Garo Kürkman’s Toprak, Ateş, Sır, 2005, pp. 80-81. Şebnem Akalın & Hülya Bilgi, Yadigar-ı Kütahya - Suna ve İnan Kıraç Koleksiyonundan Kütahya Seramikleri, Akdeniz Medeniyetleri Araştırma Enstitüsü, İstanbul, 1997, pp. 26, 32, 34, 36, 37.

Provenance: Private UK Collection

Rare Kutahya Ceramic Bowl magnifing glass

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Rare And Important Kütahya Tile Decorated With Cherubim

The present tile belongs to a small group of tiles from the Cathedral of St. James (Surp Hagob) in Jerusalem. Comparable examples have been published by John Carswell (please see: Kütahya Tiles and Pottery from the Armenian Cathedral of St. James, Jerusalem, vol: I, 1972, pl. 43 and vol: II, 1972, pl. 10- 11). Similar decorative motives can be observed on Kütahya incense-holders and hanging ornaments. (please see: ibid, vol: I, 1972, pl. 24, 36, 40, 41). An identical tile from the Suna and İnan Kıraç Collection is published in Osmanlı Seramiklerinin Görkemi - Suna-İnan Kıraç ve Sadberk Hanım Müzesi Koleksiyonlarından, Musée Jacquemart-André – Institut de France, Istanbul, 2000, pp. 138-139. Also see: Asırlar Sonra Bir arada: Sadberk Hanım Müzesi’nin Yurtdışından Türkiye’ye Kazandırdığı Eserler, Istanbul, 2005, p. 149. Cherubs first appear in the Bible in the Garden of Eden, to guard the way to the Tree of life. In Isaiah 37:16, Hezekiah prays, addressing Yahweh as "enthroned above the Cherubim" (referring to the seat of mercy). Cherubim feature at some length in the Book of Ezekiel. When they first appear in chapter one, when Ezekiel was "by the river Chebar," they are not called cherubim until chapter 10, until he saw "the likeness of four living creatures." (Ezekiel 1:5). The words Cherub and Cherubim appear many other times in the holy scriptures, referring to the Cherubim of beaten gold on the mercy seat of the Ark of the Covenant, and images on the curtains of the tabernacle, and in Solomon's temple, including two Cherubim made of olive wood overlaid with gold that were ten cubits high. Cherubim have an important place in Christian liturgy and Byzantine/Armenian iconography. The present piece is a truly rare and important example documenting the use of Cherubim on Kütahya ceramic tiles.

Provenance: Private French collection

Rare And Important Kütahya Tile Decorated With Cherubim magnifing glass

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Fine Iznik Polychrome Pottery Jug

Of compressed globular form with cylindrical neck and S-shaped handle, painted in underglaze cobalt blue, turquoise and relief red and outlined in black with an all over reserved pattern of four-dotted pomegranates interposed by tulips, the rim, base, neck and handle with scroll and geometric bands.

A comparable Iznik jug, decorated with similar motifs is published in Bernard Rackham’s Islamic Pottery and Italian Maiolica, Faber and Faber, London, 1959, pl. 223. Also see: Nurhan Atasoy & Julian Raby’s Iznik, Alexandria Press London, 1994. Another example, decorated in a similar manner, is in the Sadberk Hanim Museum in Istanbul, see Hülya Bilgi, Asırlar Sonra Bir Arada – Sadberk Hanım Müzesi’nin Yurtdışından Türkiye’ye Kazandırdığı Eserler, Vehbi Koç Vakfı, 2005, p. 72-73. Also see: Hitzel, Frédéric & Mireille Jacotin. Iznik – L’Aventure d’une Collection, Musee National de la Renaissance – Chateau d’Ecouen, Paris, 2005, p. 140-145.

Provenance: Private French Collection

Fine Iznik Polychrome Pottery Jug magnifing glass

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Important Iznik Polychrome Pottery Dish

of deep rounded form, decorated in underglaze cobalt blue, pale turquoise, relief red and olive green, outlined in black, with a central foliate motif issuing sprays of small tulips and rosettes, two large tulips, three large rosettes and three hyacinths, the rim with circular and spiral motifs, the reverse with alternating flowerheads.

The dish displays remarkable individuality in design and superb quality in execution. Its design and colour scheme indicates the truly sophisticated level achieved by the Iznik potters. It belongs to a small group of Izniks decorated with pale turquoise and olive green which is a rare and unusual palette only used for roughly a decade, in 1580s.

The composition and decorative repertoire of the dish originates from the imperial style created in the Topkapi Palace workshops in Istanbul, by master painters working for the court, in this case, master Kara Memi, who was responsible for uniting the classical leaf style (saz üslubu) with the innovative floral style (şükufe üslubu). The graceful and harmonious union of tulips, hyacinths and rosettes, capturing a movement both clockwise and counter clockwise, display a truly successful execution of this courtly style.

For scholarly discussion on the evolution of Iznik pottery during 1580s see: Nurhan Atasoy and Julian Raby, 1994, pl. 723-775. For a similar dish with pale turquoise and olive green see: Iznik – L’Aventure d’une Collection, Musee National de la Renaissance – Chateau d’Ecouen, 2005, plate. 212. A second dish in the Gulbenkian Museum featuring similar olive greens is noteworthy, see;

Iznik Pottery – Museo Calouste Gulbenkian, 1996, p. 160. References: Atasoy, Nurhan & Julian Raby, Iznik, Alexandria Press London, 1994. Ribeiro, Maria Queiroz. Iznik Pottery – Museo Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisboa, 1996 Iznik – L’Aventure d’une Collection, Musee National de la Renaissance – Chateau d’Ecouen, Paris, 2005

Provenance: Private French Collection

Important Iznik Polychrome Pottery Dishg magnifing glass

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A Rare Iznik Pottery Jug

The body of globular form supported on a broad footring, the high cylindrical neck slightly everted toward the rim, an s-shaped handle ring from the rim to the shoulder, decorated in underglaze cobalt blue and turquoise with chintamanis and paired white tulips, the footring exterior and interior with a pale yellowish glaze.

Turquoise had entered the Iznik palette by the 1520s. It was replaced to some extent by a style of decoration using the new blue and turquoise palette with what seems like a greater artistic independence, the so-called ‘potter’s style’ (Atasoy&Raby 1989, p. 115). The turquoise, cobalt-blue and pale blue palette was continually used throughout the 16th century as can be observed in the present jug. A comparable jug decorated with paired tulips, although on a white ground, is published in Bernard Rackham, Islamic Pottery and Italian Maiolica, London, 1959, pl. 42.

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A Rare Iznik Pottery Jug magnifing glass

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A Rare Blue And White Kutahya Ceramic Rose-water Sprinkler

This charming rose-water sprinkler belongs to a small group of ceramics used for serving rose-water following ceremonial events. A comparable rose-water sprinkler is published in Şebnem Akalın & Hülya Bilgi, Yadigar-ı Kütahya - Suna ve İnan Kıraç Koleksiyonundan Kütahya Seramikleri, Akdeniz Medeniyetleri Araştırma Enstitüsü, İstanbul, 1997, pp.

42-51. Also see the exhibition catalogue: Splendeurs de la Cermamique Ottomane des Collections Suna-İnan Kıraç et du Musée Sadberk Hanım, Musée Jacquemart-André – Institut de France, Istanbul, 2000, pp. 126-131.

A Rare Blue And White Kutahya Ceramic Rose-water Sprinkler magnifing glass

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Rare Tekfur-saray Pottery Tile

of square form, decorated in underglaze cobalt blue, light blue, green and relief red with a design of a flower bouquet.

Under Sultan Ahmed III (r. 1703-1730), with the enterprise of Grand-vizier Damad Ibrahim Pasha a tile workshop was established in the Tekfur Saray, in Istanbul, to revive tile production. Damad Ibrahim Pasha established a tile workshop in the so-called Tekfur Palace to revive tile production. The Tekfur Palace was part of a group of Byzantine palaces known collectively as the Blachernae Palaces built up against the land walls overlooking Eyüp. Craftsmen from Iznik kilns came to Istanbul in 1719 and ateliers were established in Tekfur Sarayı which were active between 1725 and 1735, for ten years. Tekfur Saray started production in 1724 or 1725. A trial production probably started around 1720. Most of the tiles are manufactured in 25 x 25cm, dimensions based on Iznik tiles. Tiles produced in Tekfur Saray Palace workshops are found on the Sultan Ahmed III fountain, in the Ayasofya Library, the Ferruh Kethuda Mosque in Balat, the Hekimoğlu Ali Pasha Mosque in Kocamustafapaşa, the Kaptan Paşa Mosque in Üsküdar, the Mehmed Ağa Mosque in Çarşamba, the Kandilli Mosque in Kandilli, and the Holy Mantle Pavilion in the Topkapi Palace. In addition, the Cezeri Kasım Pasha Mosque tiles are dated 1725 and the fireplace of the Fuad Pasha Yalısı, which burnt down in 1864, now in the Victoria and Albert Museum, is signed and dated 1730.

Provenance: Private UK collection

Rare Tekfur-saray Pottery Tile magnifing glass

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Important Ottoman Cuerda-seca Pottery Tile

of square form, decorated in underglaze cobalt blue, light blue, green and relief red with a design of a flower bouquet.

of square form, decorated in ultramarine blue, turquoise, green, pale manganese and yellow with black outlines, featuring a symmetrical design based on a central flowerhead from which radiate split-palmettes with lotuses at the centre, and clasps and other flowers between, with pairs of half-flowers at the centre of each side. Tiles of this rare form decorated the panels on the exterior of the Arz Odasi (Hall of Petitions or Throne Room) and the Sunnet Odasi (Circumcision Pavilion) in the Topkapi Palace (see: J.M. Rogers (ed.), The Topkapi Saray Museum-Architecture-the Harem and other Buildings, London, 1988, pls.97 & 111).These particular tiles were the work of a group of Persian craftsmen whose most elaborate accomplishment was the tiling of the interior of the mausoleum of Selim I (1522) as well as the Kasim Pasha Mosque in Bozöyük (1529). They later moved to Jerusalem to assist with the tiling of the exterior of the Dome of the Rock as part of Sultan Suleyman's project to restore the holy sites of Islam. An identical cuerda-seca tile from the Çinili Köşk Museum (inv. no. 41/645) in Istanbul is published in Crossroads of Ceramics – Turkey, where the East and the West Meet, World of Ceramic Exposition Foundation, Joseon Royal Kiln Museum, Kwon Doo Yhun, 2007, vol. II, pl. 24. Also see: Belgin Demirsar Arlı & Ara Altun. Tiles – Treasures of Anatolian Soil – Ottoman Period, Kale Group Publications, Istanbul, 2008, pp. 146-151.

Provenance: Private UK collection

Important Ottoman Cuerda-seca Pottery Tile magnifing glass

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A Rare Kutahya Ceramic Dish Decorated With Spring Flowers

This dish belongs to a small group of 18th century Kütahya ceramics renowned for gracefully combining pale blue, light green, yellow, dark coral red. These dishes were used for serving food during and after ceremonial events. It is a charming example displaying distinctive characteristics of 18th century Kutahya ceramics. A comparable 18th century dish is published in Garo Kürkman’s Toprak, Ateş, Sır, 2005, pp. 80-81. Also see Şebnem Akalın & Hülya Bilgi, Yadigar-ı Kütahya - Suna ve İnan Kıraç Koleksiyonundan Kütahya Seramikleri, Akdeniz Medeniyetleri Araştırma Enstitüsü, İstanbul, 1997, pp. 26, 32, 34, 36, 37.

Provenance: Private UK collection

A Rare Kutahya Ceramic Dish Decorated With Spring Flowers magnifing glass

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Unusual Samson Candlestick With Bouddha-lips After An Iznik Original

With slightly tapering cylindrical body and flat wide shoulder, mouth with flaring rim, underglaze painted stylised green wave and lip motifs around both the upper and lower parts of body. The inside with a label stating ‘chandelier vieux Damas’ (candlestick old Damas) with the collection number 8029.

The ceramic workshop founded Edme Samson in Paris, in 1845, produced some of the most brilliant imitations of Iznik and Kutahya pottery as well as Chinese and European works virtually indistinguishable from the originals. Please see Florence Slitine, Samson genie de l’Imitation, Paris, 2002.

The Iznik prototype for this piece is published in the exhibition catalogue Exposition d’Art Musulman, Alexandrie, 1925, pl. 34. Another Iznik original with bouddha-lips design, this time a bowl, is in the Sadberk Hanim Museum in Istanbul, see Hülya Bilgi, Asırlar Sonra Bir Arada – Sadberk Hanım Müzesi’nin Yurtdışından Türkiye’ye Kazandırdığı Eserler, Vehbi Koç Vakfı, 2005, p. 44-45. For other published examples of Samson’s work based on Iznik and Kütahya production, see ibid, pp. 75-77.

Provenance: Private French collection

Unusual Samson Candlestick With Bouddha-lips After An Iznik Original magnifing glass

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Iznik Pottery Tankard

Turkey
Circa 1580

Provenance: Private UK collection

Iznik Pottery Tankard magnifing glass

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A Rare Kutahya Ceramic Rose-water Sprinkler

This charming rose-water sprinkler belongs to a small group of ceramics used for serving rose-water following ceremonial events. A comparable rose-water sprinkler is published in Şebnem Akalın & Hülya Bilgi, Yadigar-ı Kütahya - Suna ve İnan Kıraç Koleksiyonundan Kütahya Seramikleri, Akdeniz Medeniyetleri Araştırma Enstitüsü, İstanbul, 1997, pp. 42-51. Also see the exhibition catalogue: Splendeurs de la Cermamique Ottomane des Collections Suna-İnan Kıraç et du Musée Sadberk Hanım, Musée Jacquemart-André – Institut de France, Istanbul, 2000, pp. 126-131.

Provenance: The Collection of Argine Benaki Salvago

A Rare Kutahya Ceramic Rose-water Sprinkler magnifing glass

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Rare Kutahya Pottery Covered Bowl

Turkey
18th Century

Provenance: Private UK collection

Rare Kutahya Pottery Covered Bowl magnifing glass

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Iznik Dish Decorated With Flowers

Circa 1580
Turkey

Iznik Dish Decorated With Flowers magnifing glass

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Iznik Dish Decorated With Seashells

Circa 1590
Turkey

Iznik Dish Decorated With Seashells magnifing glass

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Iznik Dish Decorated With Flowers

Circa 1580
Turkey

Iznik Dish Decorated With Flowers magnifing glass

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Iznik Dish Decorated With Flowers

Circa 1580
Turkey

Iznik Dish Decorated With Flowers magnifing glass

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Iznik Dish Decorated With Flowers

Circa 1580
Turkey

Iznik Dish Decorated With Flowers magnifing glass

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Iznik Dish Decorated With Flowers

Circa 1580
Turkey

Iznik Dish Decorated With Flowers magnifing glass

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Iznik Dish Decorated With Flowers

Circa 1580
Turkey

Iznik Dish Decorated With Flowers magnifing glass

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Iznik Dish Decorated With Flowers

Circa 1580
Turkey

Iznik Dish Decorated With Flowers magnifing glass

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Unusual Yellow Çanakkale Pottery Bird

In the form of a bird with a long curling tail standing on a waisted circular foot, decorated fantastical in relief with a rosette at the chest, with its ridged wings set back, its long neck tapering towards its globular head, slightly tilted to one side, the eyes and ears marked by protruding circles, the nose by two rhombic grooves, its beak in the form of a spout, surmounted by a horn-shaped crest, with a rimmed hole on its back, painted in green, red and black with floral and geometric patterns. Yellow was rarely applied on Çanakkale pottery. A comparable yellow Çanakkale lion from the Collection of Suna and Inan Kıraç, Istanbul, is published in Osmanlı Seramiklerinin Görkemi, XVI – XIX Yüzyıl, 2000, p. 209.

Provenance: Private UK collection

Unusual Yellow Çanakkale Pottery Bird magnifing glass

Rare Yellow Chanakkale Pottery Lion

In the form of a lion with a long curling tail, decorated in relief with a rosette at the chest, its mouth in the form of a spout, with a rimmed hole on its back, painted in yellow.

Yellow was rarely applied on Chanakkale pottery. A comparable, yellow Chanakkale lion from the Collection of Suna and Inan Kıraç, Istanbul, is published in Osmanlı Seramiklerinin Gӧrkemi, XVI – XIX Yüzyıl, 2000, p. 209.

Rare Yellow Chanakkale Pottery Lion magnifing glass

Rare Chanakkale Pottery Horse

In the form of a horse, decorated in relief with a rosette at the chest, its mouth in the form of a spout, with a rimmed hole on its back, painted in green, green, yellow, brown and black.

Yellow and green were rarely applied on Chanakkale pottery. A comparable, Chanakkale lion from the Collection of Suna and Inan Kıraç, in Istanbul, is published in Osmanlı Seramiklerinin Gӧrkemi, XVI – XIX Yüzyıl, 2000, p. 209.

Rare Chanakkale Pottery Horse magnifing glass

Unusual Chanakkale Pottery Camel

In the form of a camel, its mouth in the form of a spout, with a rimmed hole on its back, painted in white, green, brown and black. For comparable, Chanakkale animal figures from the Collection of Suna and Inan Kıraç, in Istanbul, please see Osmanlı Seramiklerinin Gӧrkemi, XVI – XIX Yüzyıl, 2000, p. 209-215.

Unusual Chanakkale Pottery Camel magnifing glass

Unusual Ottoman Tophane-Ware Teapot

Of oval form, on plain base, the squat body rising to a waisted neck and straight rim, the incised decoration with gilt highlights comprising bunches of hanging leaf patterns beneath an elongated wreath framing a calligraphic cartouche in nas-ta‘liq script providing the name and address details of the maker; “Istanbul’da Tophane’de Hendek Caddesinde Lüleci Hüsnü Numero 45” (Pipe-maker Hüsnü, 45 Hendek Street, Tophane, Istanbul), the flat lid with further similar decoration interspersed with palmettes flanked by crescent moon, with gently curved spout and loop handle with flat thumb rest. For a detailed survey on Tophane-ware please see: Bakla, Erdinç. Tophane Lüleciliği, Dış Bank / Antik Aş., İstanbul, 1993. The present teapot is a rare, signed example of Tophane-ware, outstanding both in terms of its form and size.

Provenance: Private UK Collection

Unusual Ottoman Tophane-Ware Teapot magnifing glass